The Hate U Give

The Hate U Give

eBook - 2017
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After witnessing her friend's death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter's life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died.
Publisher: New York, NY : Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2017]
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780062498557
006249855X
Call Number: EBOOK AXIS 360
Characteristics: 1 online resource (444 pages)
text file,rda
Alternative Title: Hate you give

Opinion

From Library Staff

Even if you’ve read it (or seen the movie,) this is well worth a re-read for the powerful journey that Starr makes from witness to activist.

With smooth but powerful prose delivered in Starr’s natural, emphatic voice, finely nuanced characters, and intricate and realistic relationship dynamics, this novel will have readers rooting for Starr and opening their hearts to her friends and family. --Kirkus Reviews

Movie is coming Oct 19th. One of the biggest YA books that came out in 2017. Inspired by Black Lives Matter.

So much buzz about this story. Do you know the Tupac reference?

List - Stand Up! Speak Out!
SFPL_Teen Jul 10, 2018

She watched her friend get shot in front of her.


From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

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r
red_alligator_6705
Mar 25, 2021

I loved this book! I am lost in words right now. It was a very powerful book that taught me a lot of things about racism and police brutality. Since its 2021 and in the country we live in, I had to read this for school and it was a really great book to be able to discuss with a class and get different opinions and views on, there were a lot of heavy topics like police brutality, racism and even BLM. There could not have been a more perfect time to read. This book really explained our society when it comes to racism, gangs and crimes. It also talks about a lot of teenager problems like relationship problems and friend problems.As a teenager myself I felt like the things in this book were very relevant and taught me lots. I loved the overall message of the book as well. It teaches you that if you believe in something you need to use your voice and speak up! I loved this very inspiring book and would definitely recommend it. It will teach you a lot and open your eyes to things you may have never considered. I will definitely be reading the sequal "concrete rose"

Barrie_Teen_Lists Mar 22, 2021

The Hate U Give is an award winning yet controversial debut novel by Angie
Thomas. It was one of the top ten most challenged books in 2017/18 because of the
explicit language and descriptions of drug use. It is inspired by the Black Lives Matter
movement and true events.

a
alexqise
Feb 21, 2021

This novel is about Starr Carter who lives in a black neighborhood but goes to a white school. Starr goes to a party with some of her other friends but for some reason feels unsafe. She meets her childhood best friend, Khalil Harris, for the first time in a while. During the party, a gang fight breaks out and shots are fired. Khalil takes Starr home but on the way, they are pulled over by an officer with badge number 115. 115 tells Khalil to step out of the vehicle. When Khalil opens the door to check on Starr, 115 brutally shoots and kills him. This book speaks volumes about police brutality and racism. The message is clear and effective, making it a great book against prejudice.

c
ciyer24
Feb 18, 2021

Angie Thomas’s young adult novel, The Hate U Give, is one of my favorite books. It’s very relevant to today’s events since it talks about topics such as police brutality, racism, and social justice. The book is about a high school girl, Starr, and how she deals with the shooting of one of her friends, Khalil. I really like how the author was able to pull me into the story and put me in Starr’s shoes. I was able to somewhat experience Starr’s life, and overall, the story was very interesting and inspiring. It teaches many valuable lessons about courage, bravery, learning from and amending mistakes, and more. I would definitely recommend this book to teenagers and older people.

SAPL_Teens Jan 18, 2021

The Hate U Give is a young adult novel written by Angie Thomas, describing the life of a young black teenage girl named Staar Carter. Staar is an expert at navigating the two worlds she lives in; her mostly white suburban high school and her black neighborhood where she lives with her family. This book explores Staar’s life and experiences regarding her race and ethnicity. She faces many problems throughout the novel, starting with the death of her close friend, Khalil. I believe the characters are well developed and represent today’s society. Considering what is going on right now, with the Black Lives Matter protests, I chose to read this book and I thought it was an opportunity for me to understand different perspectives better. The writing is from Staar’s point of view, which I thought was an excellent choice, since I could understand what Staar is thinking throughout the events. Overall I enjoyed The Hate U Give very much and I recommend people read it :) This book has a strong message: everyone should have the right to speak the truth no matter what they look like, their colour of skin, and their ethnicities, we are all one. Let us be Starr Carter and make everyone hear our voices! Wonderful novel! 4/5 stars, SAPL Read It & Review Contributor

Dekotah Jan 08, 2021

I'm so glad I read this book, and while it's been hyped so much, I think I agree with the statement that Starr is a flawed character, though who isn't? However when she finally speaks out about how she feels, it's so real and she isn't up her self thinking she's right all the time. I loved the messages in this book and the author found her own way of finding her voice, I have much respect. This is an important read in the YA genre and will definately be a topic of conversation for many years to come.

p
PeteCarrollsboy
Jan 03, 2021

One of the best books I've ever read. Very inspiring!

s
sammieh94
Nov 22, 2020

great book

t
Thiagob
Nov 11, 2020

I really enjoyed this book! Wishing Angie Thomas would come out with more books

z
zainabmaria
Nov 10, 2020

Centered on the topic of racial violence and police brutality, this book is very relevant now and is a poignant representation of very real issues. The young characters and urban diction makes the novel relatable for teenagers and easier to read, but it is nonetheless very well written with layers of symbolic meaning. The characters are very likable and the story is entrancing, and it leaves the reader with a newfound understanding of racial justice.

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Age

Add Age Suitability
r
red_alligator_6705
Mar 25, 2021

red_alligator_6705 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

a
alexqise
Feb 21, 2021

alexqise thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

c
ciyer24
Feb 18, 2021

ciyer24 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

s
Sophia Wu
Oct 21, 2020

Sophia Wu thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

w
wassi1976
Sep 25, 2020

wassi1976 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

l
LycheeLily
Aug 21, 2020

LycheeLily thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

k
karyn8787
Aug 05, 2020

karyn8787 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

h
haileynoa
Jul 13, 2020

haileynoa thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

v
violet_dog_11845
Jul 03, 2020

violet_dog_11845 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

n
NCHACHOU
Jun 06, 2020

NCHACHOU thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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Notices

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z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Other: Racism.

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Sexual Content: Talks about sex.

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Violence: Rioting, Shootings

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Coarse Language: A lot of swear words.

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Sexual Content: Nothing actually happens but it's implied.

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Violence: Shootings, police brutality

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Coarse Language: Lots of curse words.

d
donutwombat
Aug 27, 2017

Violence: Witness of murder

c
CYU_BJ
Aug 01, 2017

Violence: police shooting, vivid description of a friend's death

c
CYU_BJ
Aug 01, 2017

Coarse Language: extreme profanity, but not to the extent that teenagers can't handle

View All Notices

Quotes

Add a Quote
r
red_alligator_6705
Mar 25, 2021

“Once upon a time there was a hazel-eyed boy with dimples. I called him Khalil. The world called him a thug.
He lived, but not nearly long enough, and for the rest of my life I'll remember how he died.
Fairy tale? No. But I'm not giving up on a better ending.”
― Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give

c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

"'Brave doesn’t mean you’re not scared, Starr,' she says. 'It means you go on even though you’re scared. And you’re doing that.'”

c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

"That’s the problem. We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?"

c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

"'Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.’”

m
melodia1988
Jul 09, 2020

"You have to decide if the relationship is worth salvaging. Make a list of the good stuff, then make a list of the bad stuff. If one outweighs the other, then you know what you gotta do. Trust me, that method hasn't failed me yet."

m
melodia1988
Jul 08, 2020

"Sometimes things will go wrong, but the key is to keep doing right."

m
miraellie
Apr 08, 2020

“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”

CMLibrary_gjd Mar 24, 2019

pg 17 But even if I grew up in it, I wouldn't understand fighting over streets nobody owns.

pg 65 Khalil matters to us, not the stuff he did

pg 165 Her words (Mom) used to have power. If she said it was fine, it was fine. But after you've held two people as they took their last breaths, words like that don't mean shit anymore.

l
LexiLou2
Jan 08, 2019

We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?

s
shayshortt
Apr 18, 2017

It seems like they always talk about what he may have said, what he may have done, what he may not have done. I didn’t know a dead person could be charged in his own murder, you know?

Summary

Add a Summary
a
auri_12
Feb 08, 2019

Starr, the young lady, had a somewhat difficult life. In school she was one person but at home and in her neighborhood she was another. One weekend she went out with her friend. Then she saw an old friend,Khalil, and they just danced. Khalil and Starr then left the party and Khalil was driving Starr home. They got pulled over and the officer had Khalil come out the car while Starr had her hands on the dashboard because her father had taught her what to do in case of these things since she is black. Khalil was joking around and reached into the car and the officer got scared and shot him. That's where it started, Starr was very upset and scared. She was scared to talk about what happened since Khalil was in a gang and the gang would come after her even if the main one was her uncle. A lot happened after that but Starr got the courage and finally stood for what was right.

s
shayshortt
Apr 18, 2017

Starr Carter is a girl with a foot in two worlds. By day, she attends Williamson, a suburban prep school where she is one of only two black students in her year. In the evening, she goes home to Garden Heights, the city’s poor, black neighbourhood, where she has lived all her life. She is one person at home and another person at school, because she can’t be too “bougie” in the neighbourhood, or too “ghetto” at school. But the wall she has carefully built between her two selves begins to crumble when she is the only witness to a police officer shooting and killing her childhood friend, Khalil. The killing gains national headlines as protestors take to the streets to protest the murder of yet another unarmed black boy. In the day’s following Khalil’s death, Starr faces a choice between remaining silent, and speaking up. But even if she can find her voice, will it be enough to get justice for Khalil?

SPL_Brittany Apr 09, 2017

"Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right."

Sixteen year old Starr moves between two worlds: the poor neighbourhood where she lives and the affluent high school she attends. The uneasy balance is shattered when she becomes a witness to the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was black, unarmed, and doing nothing wrong.

Soon afterwards, the media gains interest, and Khalil’s death becomes a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, a gangbanger even a drug dealer. While the police don’t seem interested in finding out what really happened, rioting begins and protesters take to the streets in Khalil’s name, as his death ignites long held tensions between the black community and their treatment by the police.

Throughout, Starr struggles with her identity as her two worlds collide. Her fear is palpable as she confronts system that she knows is working against her. She’s afraid to speak out yet worries that if she does not Khalil’s murderer could escape justice. Will she find her voice for Khalil?

Angie Thomas writes a beautiful, timely and emotionally charged novel about a teenage girl dealing with very real and complex relationships. Thomas confronts issues of race and class sending an incredibly powerful message to readers as well as those wanting to understand the blacklivesmatter movement. Her writing style and characters will engage you from page one, and will have readers falling in love with the entire Carter family. An engrossing and refreshing read, it is hard to believe that this is Thomas’s first novel, already the rights have been given for this to be made into a feature film.

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