Looking Through You

Looking Through You

Rare & Unseen Photographs From The Beatles Book Archive

Book - 2016
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In 1963, it was unusual for a pop group to have a monthly magazine devoted exclusively to their career. Only Elvis Presley had been considered important enough to warrant such an honour. But then the Beatles were unusual. Within the space of that pivotal year, the Fab Four became the biggest thing in British popular culture and their worldwide fame was soon inescapable. One of the first to astutely recognise their greatness was Sean O'Mahony and the monthly magazine he launched with the full blessing of The Beatles and their manager Brian Epstein The Beatles Book. Looking Through You presents a selection of over 300 images from the precious Beatles Book photo archive, many unpublished or unseen in their original form from the original negatives, as well as the story behind the success of the regular Beatle bulletin. With each new issue, Beatle fans worldwide would voraciously devour the contents from cover-to-cover, discovering the Fab Four's latest news and activities and most of all, savouring the exclusive B&W photographs, captured by in-house photographer, Leslie Bryce. During the magazine's six-year run only a small fraction of these photographs were printed and then often altered in some way. The Beatles Book Monthly captured the Beatles' development from British provincial theatres through foreign tours including their ground-breaking first American visit and onwards to the band's withdrawal into the recording studio. It was unique in its access as well as concert tours and television shows, the band were photographed off duty, at their homes and in the studio locales that were generally out-of-bounds to most Beatle observers. This unique and original photographic record preserves many important moments within the Beatles' career, providing a historically important glimpse into the world's greatest ever entertainment phenomenon.
Publisher: London :, Omnibus Press,, c2016
ISBN: 9781468312751
1468312758
Call Number: 780.2 ZB38b
Characteristics: 207 pages : illustrations ; 33 cm
Additional Contributors: Dean, Johnny 1932-

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j
jr3083
Jan 14, 2017

As part of my nostalgic after-glow from seeing Eight Days a Week, I snapped up this book at my library when I saw it on the New Non Fiction shelves. It features beautifully clear photographs that were taken by photographer Leslie Bryce who, along with published Sean O'Mahony, issued a small monthly booklet called 'The Beatles Monthly Magazine' during the Beatles phenomenon of the 1960s. ...

At first,The Beatles Book contained biographical articles to introduce 'the boys' to their fans, but increasingly it became a way of keeping the world at bay. The Beatles of 1963 and 1964 welcomed the photographic publicity, but by late 1966/early 1967 the torrent of photographs had slowed to a trickle. The final photographs in the book are mainly taken at recording sessions - Sgt Peppers, Revolver etc- where the tension between them is palpable. ...

The photographs have interesting little captions and snippets of fascinating facts. Did you know, for instance, that the last note in the gobbledegook at the end of Sgt Peppers can only be heard by dogs? [I don't have a dog to try it out on anymore].

Anyway- beautiful photos that I certainly hadn't seen before and an interesting flip-through if you're in the mood for some innocent nostalgia.

For my full review see: https://residentjudge.wordpress.com/2017/01/14/looking-through-you-rare-and-unseen-photographs-from-the-beatles-book-archive-by-leslie-brice/

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